One Night in Miami (2020) Review

RATING: 4/5

Four famous 20th century African-Americans, from different backgrounds, spend the night at a hotel and have intense talks about what it means to be who they are and it how it impacts the world they live.

Regina King, as an actress, she nails it. As a debut director, I’m looking forward to her next project.

The introduction to this was nicely done at introducing the four main characters, Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Sam Cooke, and Jim Brown. From their introductions, one can tell who they are based on their personalities and what they were striving in life; based on the difficulties brought onto them around a volatile and hateful time in U.S history. It also gave forth some good foreshadowing of how there different perspectives on things was going to bring about some heated conversations.

Now a majority of the movie took place in one room in a hotel. This isn’t the first where one setting is used. A great example is “12 Angry Men.” These types of film really need to strive and entertain the audience with its dialogue to distract them from being bored at looking at the same scenery for extended periods. To which “One Night in Miami” did that well.

When each of the four men’s ideologies clash, primarily Malcolm and Cooke, it was engaging and one can understand their point of views. Their goals for something better are there, but their journey in achieving that differed from one another. One wished to be militant in their approach, while one geared more into the passive path. One wanted to see who would get the best chance of one upping the other. Which journey was the best for all? It was nice to see the four men learn from each other and from their, build off some form of pact in wanting to make a rightful change for the world.

Performances in the movie were great. Though I will say the casting was a tad dodgy. Most notably for Malcolm X played Kingsley Ben-Adir. I just didn’t see him as X when looking at the face. As I said prior, the dialogue was really good. Each scene seemed to touch a different part of the character’s lives. It made one wonder how these men would take each other’s stances on touchy subjects.

The music was pretty good. The standouts scenes of course came from Cooke. One was where he had to improvise when his mic cut off and his closing track “A Change Is Gonna Come.”

Now the movie was selling on the interactions/confrontations between four men, but it felt more like two. This seemed more like an X vs. Cooke feature, while Ali and Brown were there as moral support. Brown suffered the worst in terms of development. One got tidbits of what his life was like during the time, but there wasn’t a lot shown about him for me to latch on. Ali was better for he was on the fence on whether accepting a new faith was the right choice. There was development there.

But the movie felt liked it focused more so on X and Cooke. Which made sense seeing they were practically opposites for how the movie portrayed them. Both used mics to say what’s on their minds, but their voice was different. Still entertaining, but it would have been nice if Ali and especially Brown, contributed more.

For her debut, King soared. She proved herself that not only she can be a great actress, but also a great director. “One Night in Miami” had great performances, good characters, nice music, and engaging and thought-provoking dialogue. Highly recommend it.

Check out: Malcolm X (1992) Review

YouTube: LoneCentric Pictures/Tk Theater Productions

Instagram: tk_theater/lonecentricpic

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