42 (2013) Review

42

RATING: 3.5/5

The story about the early days of Jackie Robinson’s baseball career.

The movie that brought eyes onto actor Chadwick Boseman.

Many of the performances in the movie were good. Boseman and Harrison Ford were the best. Even though Ford’s role was a bit cliche with his rugged and growly voice and old mentor-like persona, he still was enjoyable to watch. These two were the ones that a viewer can stand behind as they carried the most heart and soul for the film.

Actor Alan Tudyk played the racist coach Ben Chapman. I bring him up because, despite his 10 minutes of screentime, he delivered in bringing forth some relatable feelings for Robinson. To which I’ll bring up later.

Now I’m not a big baseball or sports guy for that matter. I only knew Robinson as the first black major league baseball player, nothing more. I mean I figured in his early days that he did take verbal abuse from all sorts of people. Whether it was from the crowd or from his own teammates, I figured as such. But actually witnessing the movie and reading about what really went down afterward, it truly made me respect the man even more.

Robinson was a guy who, very easily, could have quit playing baseball amongst the white crowd. He could have quit and not take the on-the-field and out-of-field bullying that he endured over those first years. But he persisted through the hate. Robinson did his absolute best to block the harsh words and play what he loved playing. He wanted to show the world that black players can be capable of participating in the major leagues. He had his back, along with a few others as shown in the film.

Ford’s character, Branch Rickey, a few Dodger teammates, and Robinson’s wife, Rachel, wanted him to move forward to bring about his talents. It was nice to see the support bring brought onto Robinson. My favorite scene in the movie was when Rickey was comforting Robinson after being hearing slurs thrown at him by Chapman. Granted this was a scene that didn’t happen in real life, but I feel this was a good illustration of what Robinson’s mind was like. One can gravitate easily to him and you wanted to see him make it up there.

As far as the rest of the movie was concerned, it did play itself rather safe and predictable. Like it doesn’t take any extra steps in wanting to see more into the personal life of Robinson, outside of his early baseball days. The film tapped on it occasionally, but not enough. While it was interesting to see the teammates and various baseball officials not wanting to near Robinson or play in their cities, it be nice to view beyond that.

Even with the beat-for-beat plot, it was performed and played out well. There was enough heart to make one care about the difficulties that Robinson endured. One wanted to root for him; to succeed in the violent and hate-filled world that encompassed him. Definitely recommend it. At the time of writing this review, this was another good reminder of the current status that the nation was going through in the troubling year of 2020.

The life of Jackie Robinson runs parallel to the life of Chadwick Boseman. Both men had to struggle with something in order to fulfill the loving people and fans in their lives. The fact the two men kept fighting for what they loved, was something that many would define as, a hero.

RIP Jackie Robinson

RIP Chadwick Boseman

YouTube: Tk Theater Productions/LoneCentric Pictures

Instagram: tk_theater/lonecentricpic

 

The Sisters Brothers (2018) Review

sister

RATING: 2/5

[SPOILERS]

A journey to find a chemist for their boss puts two brothers at odds and they must find some way to reconcile those differences.

I’m not a shallow guy. I’m not asking for all westerns to be the same shoot-em-ups and action-frenzy flicks. I do appreciate change, but still, can it at least captivate me.

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